Teachers begin using cell phones for class lessons by AP: Yahoo! Tech

  • Spanish teacher using Cell Phones in class – good descriptions of the activity.

    tags: cellphone

    • They divided into groups and Leonard began sending them text messages in Spanish: Find something green. Go to the cafeteria. Take a picture with the school secretary.
    • Spanish vocabulary becomes a digital scavenger hunt. Notes are copied with a cell phone camera. Text messages serve as homework reminders.

    • Much more attention has gone to the ways students might use phones to cheat or take inappropriate pictures. But as the technology becomes cheaper, more advanced and more ingrained in students’ lives that mentality is changing.
    • “It really is taking advantage of the love affair that kids have with technology today,” said Dan Domevech

    • Seventy-one percent of teens had a cell phone by early 2008, according to a survey by the Pew Internet & American Life Project. That percentage remains relatively steady regardles of race, income or other demographic factors.

    • Most schools still have prohibitive policies curtailing cell phone use — often with good reason.

    • instigated through text messages.
    • teens have been arrested for “sexting”
    • In one poll, more than 35 percent of teens admitted cheating with a cell phone.
    • cheating and bullying exist with or without the phones, and that once they are allowed, the inclination to use them for bad behavior dissipates.
    • Spanish teacher Katie Titler has used cell phones for students to dial and record themselves speaking for tests.

      “Specifically for foreign language, it’s a great way to both formally and informally assess speaking, which is really hard to do on a regular basis because of class sizes and time,” Titler said.

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

My reflections on this article:

  • They divided into groups and Leonard began sending them text messages in Spanish: Find something green. Go to the cafeteria. Take a picture with the school secretary.
    • I love this idea! Our AUP still prohibits cameras, including the ones on a phone, so it would not work … right now.

  • “It really is taking advantage of the love affair that kids have with technology today,” said Dan Domevech

    • I have been using cell phones in my Spanish classroom since the end of September. The students are still as excited as the first day when I allow them to use their phones.

  • Seventy-one percent of teens had a cell phone by early 2008, according to a survey by the Pew Internet & American Life Project. That percentage remains relatively steady regardles of race, income or other demographic factors.
    • It is interesting and important to note that the have vs. have not barrier is less distinct with cell phones. They are attainable for people of all different levels, genders, races, etc. 

  • cheating and bullying exist with or without the phones, and that once they are allowed, the inclination to use them for bad behavior dissipates.
    • The rules that a teacher establishes with the students for using cell phones will control the success or failure of using cell phones in the class. I established up front that when students brought their cell phones to class, they must immediately take them out of their pocket and put them face down on their desk. We do not use them everyday, but they are still allowed to bring them. If they are out on the students desk, it will be harder for them to text than having it under the desk or in a pocket. So far, this has worked out great.

  • Spanish teacher Katie Titler has used cell phones for students to dial and record themselves speaking for tests.

    • I wonder what website or resource she is using. I know that Yodio will allow people to call the website and describe photos or create mini podcasts. The problem with Yodio is everyone’s cell phone/name must be registered. I could not set up a picture and have the students call/comment. Voicethread gives the students 2 minutes free to call in, but after that, you have to pay.
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About Lisa Butler

Middle school teacher of Social Studies and Spanish, tech trainer, Flocabulary MC, Nearpod PioNear, and Edcamp Hershey Founder. I have embraced the power of blogging and reviewing products. If I am not doing something with ed or tech, I am probably reading, baking, running, or traveling.
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